20 February 2011

Green Tea Cake with Azuki Beans

Soft, fluffy, moist matcha cake, layered with azuki beans and freshly whipped cream, topped with a generous sprinkling of matcha powder. 


Now, that describes my vision of a perfect green tea cake. But, alas, reality bites...

I used a genoise recipe for the cake. And although it appeared to be rather moist, it was actually on the drier side. Maybe more butter/milk next time. If that works, I'll post the recipe. In the meantime, just pictures...

It also pays to have patience when it comes to slicing your cakes.
Learn a lesson from me... for cakes with whipped cream, chill them till firm before slicing. Otherwise, you get a mess like my cake...

25 comments:

edith said...

E, I love green tea and this one makes me drool.

Cucina di Barbara said...

Hello,
so lovely discover your blog! which is very nice and tempting.
Now I am following you!
Have a nice sunday, Barbaraxx

The Sweetylicious said...

it look so nicely done and delicious! (:

CaThY said...

Wow.. I love green tea bakes, this looks so delicious :)

Jean said...

your cake still looks irresistible to me :) this looks better than the BreadTalk version imo!

travellingfoodies said...

wow! it looks good! reminds me of Sadaharu Aoki's macha tiramisu!

Did you cook your own azuki beans or have those ready in tin ones?

DG said...

Eelin, it's 4 layers cake, and they are so neatly layered. Well done! It's gorgeous.

crustabakes said...

omg, these are so neatly layered!! You must have some in built architectural instincts!

NEL, the batter baker said...

Edith, Cathy
>> Next time make matcha cake for you two la.

Barbara
>> Thanks for visiting, and hope you'll find some recipes that work well for you.

Jasmine, Jean, Doris, Lina
>> Thanks so much for your encouraging words. All of you are amazing bakers, and I've so much to learn from all of you.

travellingfoodies
>> I made my own azuki beans. Just boiled red beans with some sugar till they're soft. You can make a large batch in advance and just freeze the balance for next time. Next time, I might try pureeing the beans and making azuki mousse instead. Think it'll work?

j3ss kitch3n said...

beautiful cake Eelin =)

Jo said...

Instead of using a genoise cake, try using a chiffon sponge instead. I made a similar dessert as this and the cake was very soft and moist. I love the how your green tea comes out so well in the photos.

NEL, the batter baker said...

j3ss,
Thanks :)

Jo,
Thanks for the suggestion. Next time will try chiffon. After sprinkling the green tea on the whipped cream, the colour darkened. Now it looks like grass. LOL.

busygran said...

Don't worry about looks. As long as it tastes delicious, nobody will remember what it looks like. Nicely done!

Passionate About Baking said...

This looks really good! I've yet to attempt a green tea cream cakes. I'll wait for your recipe. :)

NEL, the batter baker said...

Judy,
Thanks for the encouragement :)

Jane,
I hope to find time to try this again soon. If successful, will definitely share the recipe. stay tuned...

Zoe said...

Very professional made...just like those in the stores.

Bakertan said...

hey eelin,

nice layer cake you have there. great job!

genoise cakes tend to be dry and coarse if they're baked in round/square pans as opposed to being baked in sheet pans for swiss rolls which they will still retain their moisture. thats due to the difference in baking time, the longer the dryer it becomes.

More melted butter butter melt do the trick. Else, you have to rely on syrup. Alternatively, you can try baking the genoise in a sheet pan like you would for swiss rolls, then slice it into 3 or 4 rectangles and layer them to get a small layer cake. the cake layers should be quite moist and the baking time is alot shorter, like 8-12 mins.

NEL, the batter baker said...

Zoe,
Thanks for stopping by, and for your kind words :)

ZY,
Thanks so much for the advice. Have so much to learn from you. What you said about the baking time makes sense. Next time, I'll try shallower layers. Thanks!

Quay Po Cooks said...

Eelin,
What a lovely cake. Beatiful green and looks so moist and fluffy. Love it!

Bakertan said...

eelin,

genoise sheet cakes are normally baked at 200 degrees C while round/square genoise cakes are baked at 180 degrees C. Hence genoise sheet cakes are able to retain their moisture while being done at an earlier time.

To doubly ensure that sheet cakes maintain their moisture, cover the pan with a moist cloth/wrap the pan with a big plastic bag when they are cooling. This is a trick used normally for swiss rolls to keep the genoise sponge moist.

travellingfoodies said...

Eelin,
I would definitely work but I wouldn't pulverise all the beans as some texture contrast would be good yeah? :)

NEL, the batter baker said...

Veron,
Thanks so much :)

ZY,
Thanks again. You have a good point about covering the cake while cooling.

Alan,
You're right - some texture would be nice ;) Hope to try your macarons some day. They look so perfect!

Jess @ Bakericious said...

looks great!

Shirley @ Kokken69 said...

Layer cake is not easy... I am not a neat person and hence always admire others who work on challenging recipes like these. I agree with Jo, I think a chiffon sponge may be really good for this recipe.

NEL, the batter baker said...

Jess,
Thanks :)

Shirley,
Thanks for your encouragement on the choux. I'm definitely gonna try chiffon the next time round. You should give layer cakes a try too. My early attempts were not very pretty looking. But it takes practice :) Like how I'll need lots of practice to get photos as gorgeous as yours!

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